Thirty Prospects in Thirty Days: Jameson Taillon

Thirty Prospects in Thirty Days covers the top prospects for the Pittsburgh Pirates, giving a brief overview of who they are as a player and their minor league statistics (so far).

Jameson Taillon, the Pirates’ first round (second overall) draft pick in the 2010 MLB Draft, is rated the second best prospect in the system. Taillon is a powerful righty with a fastball that sits comfortably in the 92-96 MPH range, though it’s been clocked at 99. A potential problem with Taillon is that he tends to keep his fastball higher up in the zone.

 

The best curveball in the Pirates’ system belongs to Taillon. Taillon’s curveball, when effective, has a high trajectory to it, making it look like a high fastball out of his hand, but has a mean late break to it, causing plenty of swings and misses. Taillon can tip his pitch slighty, having a higher arm angle throwing the breaking ball than when he throws his heater.

The second breaking ball Taillon can throw is a slider. Although it is not anywhere near his curveball, Taillon’s slider has some nasty bite to it, bearing down and in on lefty batters and traveling away from righties. Taillon throws the slider with early break, but the late break it has is unfair. You think it’s done moving, and then it breaks while you’re swinging at what you think is a hittable pitch.

The final pitch Taillon has the ability to throw is a changeup. Although it is his worst pitch, as is the case with most 20-year old pitchers, it has been clocked at 8-12 MPH below his fastball with some fading action.It’s fundamentally sound, but it just needs to be thrown more to develop.

Jameson Taillon has excellent control, but he does not have very good command of his pitches. He often throws pitches over the heart of the plate, which allows batters to get a lot of his pitches.

ETA: September 2013

 Baseball-Reference statistics

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